GrasshopperNotes.com - Thoughts for inspired living


Turn The Tables - Grasshopper

 It seems to me that the phrase “Turn the tables” is an updated version of “Love thy neighbor.”

I always thought it was an expression of turning a disadvantage into an advantage, and it is. But it reflects something deeper.

 

One of the early usages of “Turn the tables” came from 16th Century, English Theologian Robert Sanderson. He wrote, Whosoever thou art that dost another wrong, do but turn the tables: imagine thy neighbour were now playing thy game, and thou his."

 

If you can’t appreciate another’s plight your table is empty of nourishment.

 

To turn the tables, just take a pause in the conditioned mindset that yours is the only problem.

 

Reminds me of a message I offered to all the broadcasters who worked for me years ago. “Don’t complain about your health on the air.” It usually took the form of “I have a nasty cold” or some such. I told them that some of the people listening had dread diseases and were looking for the comfort the radio brought them. It was obvious to anyone who was listening attentively that they sounded a little “snotty.” Playing that up delivered the wrong message – that yours was the only problem.

 

Another lesson I learned along the way was to bring only cheer when visiting someone in a hospital or convalescing. They feel bad enough without you asking them how they feel. That only gets them to associate with their pain, not alleviate it.

 

Turning the tables is simply walking a mile in someone else’s shoes. It accomplishes two things:

 

1.      It helps you to connect better by not singing your personal blues.

2.      It gives you a finer appreciation of what another needs to help them out of the weeds.

 

Just remember how you felt the last time you opened up to someone about your pain and their response was to tell you about theirs. That only keeps healing food off the table by demonstrating a lack of empathy.

 

Want to feel the love it generates? Turn the tables as often as you’re able.

 

All the best,

John



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