GrasshopperNotes.com - Thoughts for inspired living


You’re Eventually Going To Leave Your Problems Behind; So Consider Now - Grasshopper

I've stated it before but it bears repeating: Dead people don't have problems.

That's not a caviler assertion - just a fact.

You're eventually going to pass on, so consider taking a pass on your problems before you go.

 

People who die leave lots behind – their clothing, their memorabilia, their worries and their woes.

 

Ponder getting a head start on leaving your problems behind while you're still living, so you can live more.

 

What keeps you hanging on to your problems? - your thoughts, of course.

 

We make situations into problems by constantly thinking about them. The more thinking we do about a problem, the longer a problem stays in place. Solutions are always delayed by thinking.

 

"Stop thinking" may be a bumper sticker that catches your eye, but it's a directive without direction. We will not stop thinking anytime soon, but we can begin to notice the flavor of our thinking and begin to shorten its visit by noticing it.

 

When the "problem" thought comes around for the "umpteenth" time, notice it without engaging it in debate. It's like noticing a thunderstorm. You don't go outside and engage with a thunderstorm, nor is it productive to go inside and engage with a thought.

 

You can notice a storm from start to finish. You can also notice a thought from start to finish. All storms have a beginning and an end. The difference between a thunderstorm and a thought is that the storm will have a finite existence. The thought will go on infinitely if we engage it in debate.

 

You begin to leave your problems behind when you begin to notice your thoughts about them. If you just observe your mind at work rather than getting in a heated debate with it about those thoughts, you "grease the skids" for your problem thoughts to move on more quickly, leaving you more time to live.

 

You don't have to die to leave your problems behind; you just have to notice them from a safe place of observation. Doing so, allows your storm to pass much more quickly.

 

All the best,

John



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